The self-contained air cells in the ADAPTOR Pad can be used as an interface on virtually any flat or contoured surface to protect skin and soft tissues.

Especially useful when cut to fit various surface shapes such as sides of wheelchairs, trays, head and foot rests, inside of helmets, or for any surfaces that may need protection.

Additional Product Variations
  • Absorbs shock
  • Protects against shear and friction
  • Easily cleaned and disinfected
  • Durable
  • Closed air cells, so product maintains efficacy even if a single cell is cut or puntured
  • Made of flame-resistant, black neoprene (not made with natural rubber latex)
Protection

ROHO® is the worldwide leader of seating solutions to prevent and treat pressure injuries, including deep tissue injury, while providing skin and soft tissue protection.

Clinical Evidence

ROHO has been in over 90 scientific and clinical studies to reinforce and verify that a ROHO DRY FLOATATION® cushion heals, treats and prevents pressure injuries, including deep tissue injury.

Adjustability

ROHO DRY FLOATATION cushions, unlike foam products, provide the ability to constantly adjust and conform with an individual’s body, now, and as he or she changes throughout the months and years.

Adaptability

ROHO DRY FLOATATION cushions support the shifts and movements that individuals make throughout each day.

Education & Evidence

Proof in motion.

The right chair can make all the difference — in your life, in your independence, and in your long-term health. See how we’re using the latest medical research to deliver information that moves everyone in our industry forward.

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Latest Blog Posts
Group 5 Power Wheelchairs

Part 19 in our seriesA to Z Considerations for Seating & Wheeled Mobility: A Quick Reference Clarifying Confusion Around CRT. SeePart 1,Part 2,Part 3,Part 4,Part 5,Part 6,Part 7,Part 8,Part 9,Part 10,Part 11,Part 12,Part 13,Part 14,Part 15,Part 16,Part 17, and Part 18.

While we have covered all options for adults when it comes to power wheelchair bases, there is one last topic to address. They are Group 5 power wheelchairs, which are simply pediatric power bases

Group 4 Power Wheelchairs

Part 18 in our seriesA to Z Considerations for Seating & Wheeled Mobility: A Quick Reference Clarifying Confusion Around CRT. SeePart 1,Part 2,Part 3,Part 4,Part 5,Part 6,Part 7,Part 8,Part 9,Part 10,Part 11,Part 12,Part 13,Part 14,Part 15, Part 16, and Part 17.

While Medicare does not recognize/pay for wheelchairs in the Group 4 category, it is important to at least briefly discuss this grouping as some private insurances, as well as the VA, will occasionally fund these bases. Also, some clients choose to pay the difference—out of pocket or through fundraising—to upgrade to this grouping of chair as it really is what best meets their needs.

Climbing the Insurance Ladder: Group 3 Power Wheelchairs

Part 17 in our seriesA to Z Considerations for Seating & Wheeled Mobility: A Quick Reference Clarifying Confusion Around CRT. SeePart 1,Part 2,Part 3,Part 4,Part 5,Part 6,Part 7,Part 8,Part 9,Part 10,Part 11,Part 12,Part 13,Part 14,Part 15, and Part 16.

Last week, we wrapped up our discussion of a general look at Group 2 power wheelchairs and who may qualify for this type of power mobility device. This week, we continue to “climb” the ladder to the next rung: Group 3 power wheelchairs.

View all blog posts.